World Bank G20 Youth Event

June 19 / 11:06 EDT by Celina Agaton

On June 21, I’ll be sharing how our Open Knowledge Kit regeneration program helps non-Youthmappers and non-technical youth learn mapping skills that create local data employment to earn 2-17 times higher daily wages through mostly remote training. These skills combine with climate change modeling and early warning flood systems at 70-1000 percent lower costs to remove barriers to addressing climate change.

The World Bank Group (WBG) Youth Summit Committee (YS) and the Youth-to-Youth Community team (Y2Y) are organizing a joint event in the context of the Youth G20 (Y20) Pre-Summit event in Indonesia. The goal of this joint event is to highlight the role of the youth in addressing the impacts of climate change, foster environmental inclusion, and to discuss the importance of having a youth-led green, resilient and inclusive development approach for people and the planet.  

The World Bank Group (WBG) Youth Summit Committee (YS) and the Youth-to-Youth Community team
(Y2Y) are organizing a joint event in the context of the Youth G20 (Y20) Pre-Summit event in Indonesia.


AVPN G20 Social Impact Event

June 19 / 10:54 EDT by Celina Agaton

Thanks to the generous support of Julie Ann Wrigley Global Futures Laboratory, Arizona State University Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation, I’m able to present our Open Knowledge Kit program at special session at the Asian Venture Partner Network’s Global Conference, the Official Social Impact Event for the G20 on June 21-24, 2022.

Here’s our session description:

Early warning weather alerts, real-time traffic maps, ride-hailing services. Technology has quietly become part of our daily lives.

SEAsia is home to the world’s fastest growing e-commerce market. As a result, there is a pressing need to ensure that communities are not left behind in an increasingly digital world.

In this session we will talk about climate smart solutions that contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of reducing hunger, closing the gender gap and improving environmental management.

Access to technology can level the playing field for struggling rural farmers, new low-cost data collection models result in 17 times higher wages for local communities and an app for informal waste workers can contribute to a clean ocean.

What needs to happen to fully utilize the potential of green tech for our planet and our societies? What can funders do to empower local communities to develop their own solutions? How can bold innovations be fostered?

Key Takeaways:

  • How green tech can open a path towards sustainable growth across the spectrum of climate, gender and livelihoods
  • Beyond free and open source technologies, placing cross-sector communities at the centre of knowledge stewardship and employment models provides the stability critical to bridge successful policy and program implementation, while dramatically reducing costs and carbon footprints
  • Initiatives to improve recovery rates of plastics in the ocean need to take into account the social and economic impacts on informal waste worker


Is the Philippines the Next Global Film Hub?

March 3 / 20:23 EST by Celina Agaton

On March 1st I joined the American Chamber of Commerce’s Creative Industries Committee panel on supporting the Philippine film industry. Per usual, I spoke about the practical aspects of developing the film and creative industry: lack of accurate data and prioritization in a largely informal sector. I shared our local Open Knowledge Kit methodology that provides faster, cheaper, more accurate and verifiable data while creating local data employment opportunities well above the minimum wage. I also shared footage from one of the creative industry production hubs we are developing in the Philippines, with another location set in Indonesia to support the ASEAN region.

Media use is seen as a very important part of Filipino life as exposure to media mirrors the desire to be part of both society and the environment. Among the Filipino people, films are considered to be one of the popular forms of entertainment as it directly employs around 260,000 Filipinos and generate generating around ₱2 billion incomes per annum. Within the Southeast Asian region, Philippine cinema remains the most vibrant and diverse as the majority of films made in the region came from the Philippines along with the film industries of Thailand and Indonesia.

However, on a global scale, the downfall of Philippine cinema is traced to Filipinos’ exposure to foreign films rather than mainstream cinema. The competition from foreign films with better editing techniques, cinematography, story concept, and far bigger production made it difficult for Filipino films to compete. Also, high taxation for film producers affects the number of films available. Hence, with the advent of new technologies and new media platforms, the industry is faced with new challenges.

The technical quality of foreign films made it difficult for the local industry to compete since moviegoers mostly watched films for entertainment and a sort of enjoyment and diversion. Furthermore, the Philippine film industry has faced incredible drawbacks since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic – from the continued closure of cinemas that affected the production of local films, to the challenges plaguing the safe conduct of production activities and onsite events.

Media use is seen as a very important part of Filipino life as exposure to media mirrors the desire to be part of both society and the environment. Among the Filipino people, films are considered to be one of the popular forms of entertainment as it directly employs around 260,000 Filipinos and generate generating around ₱2 billion incomes per annum. Within the Southeast Asian region, Philippine cinema remains the most vibrant and diverse as the majority of films made in the region came from the Philippines along with the film industries of Thailand and Indonesia.

Read the full session description.



Understanding Risk Asia

January 13 / 08:37 EST by Celina Agaton

We were invited to present at two sessions at the 2021 Understanding Risk Asia conference hosted by World Bank and National University of Singapore.

I led a solo session talking about our Open Knowledge Kit program and four career tracks and also curated the panel presenting the developers behind our technology and implementing partners.

Open Knowledge Kit (OK Kit) is a free and open-source tool kit to empower local communities with digital employment through geospatial data collection, analytics and monitoring toward the stewardship of their economic, climate, and social prosperity. Surveys, disaster and climate change modeling and 3D reconstruction are now possible at much lower costs, training local and non-technical communities.

OK Kit Addresses the key barriers to achieving the SDGs:

1. Short-term and uncoordinated donor projects led by community outsiders 
2. Expensive, proprietary and closed technology systems
3. The gender gap
4. Decent Work


ASEAN Creative Economy Business Forum

January 13 / 08:21 EST by Celina Agaton

This past November I represented the Philippines at the ASEAN Creative Economy Business Forum and shared progress on the Creative Industries Bill and Tax-Free program to support micro to medium enterprise. I also shared our Open Knowledge Kit program that provides local employment through remote and in-person training using free and open source data collection, mapping, and analytics tools to help inform and provide better cross-sector prioritization, coordination and monitoring of initiatives.


FOSS4G 2021 Buenos Aires

September 27 / 07:37 EDT by Celina Agaton

I’ll be speaking at FOSS4G 2021, the world’s largest geospatial conference on free and open source software.

Pandemic and Climate Recovery through FOSS4G Local Knowledge Stewardship and Employment Models

September 30, 14:30–15:00, Puerto Madryn

The Open Knowledge Kit Regeneration Program addresses key challenges in the pandemic and climate crisis: How to collect near real-time data, how to create research, policy and programs that reflect the central role of women in the economic and social prosperity of their communities, how to address the political and funding barriers in hazard and climate change modeling, and how to develop fully local research teams to address revolving door outsider and expat models in vulnerable communities.





IUCN World Conservation Congress

September 1 / 22:26 EDT by Celina Agaton
IUCN World Conservation Congress, 7-15 January 2021, Marseilles, France -  GGCP

This Saturday September 4th, I”ll be joining the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN Wolrd Congress’ Supporting Indigenous peoples in Defending Nature and Traditions with Geospatial Technologies panel to discuss how our Open Knowledge Kit Regeneration Program provides life saving employment, strengthens local knowledge stewardship and provides better quality real-time data, and industry-leading mapping analytics, disaster and climate change modeling with free and open source tools.

Saturday September 4th at 13:30 – 15:30 GMT+2 | 5:30am PST| 8:30pm PHT

Session Description 

Evidence from across the globe shows that Indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) are effective stewards of nature, yet they are constantly faced with threats from outside interests and their voices are often marginalized in decision-making processes. IPLCs frequently lack consistent and timely access to the data, technologies, and resources necessary to effectively gain official recognition of and uphold their land rights and monitor new threats to nature and their livelihoods. In this campus session, speakers will share their experiences from applying and designing innovative geospatial technologies and learn about the current suite of geospatial tools designed to increase access and use by diverse conservation actors. One key outcome of this session will be an action plan to improve knowledge exchange of ideas, capacity-building resources, and accessible geospatial technologies appropriate for Indigenous-led mapping and monitoring.

Speakers:

Keynote Speaker: Melanie Goodchild, the founder of the Turtle Island Institute

Session host: James Rattling Leaf Sr., GEO Indigenous Alliance

Presenter #1: Giovanni Soliman Bete Reyes, Philippine Indigenous Peoples Community Conserved Territories and Areas Consortium

Presenter #2: Celina Agaton, Fil-Canadian founder, MapPH

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress takes place on Septembe 3-11, 2021. The IUCN World Conservation Congress is where the world comes together to set priorities and drive conservation and sustainable development action. IUCN’s 1400+ government, civil society and indigenous peoples’ Member organisations vote on major issues, action which guides humanity’s relationship with our planet for the decades ahead. IUCN’s unique and inclusive membership gives the Congress a powerful mandate as it is not solely government or non-government, but both together.

IUCN was created in 1948, and has evolved into the world’s largest and most diverse environmental network. It harnesses the experience, resources and reach of its more than 1,400 Member organisations and the input of some 13,000 experts. IUCN is the global authority on the status of the natural world and the measures needed to safeguard it. Our experts are organised into six commissions dedicated to species survival, environmental law, protected areas, social and economic policy, ecosystem management, and education and communication.

The Congress is also the largest marketplace for conservation and sustainable development science, practice and policy. Scientists, policy experts, business leaders and professionals from around the globe: share their experience, innovation and latest research.

  • 8 days
  • 1000+ participants
  • 1300+ interactive sessions
  • 160+ countries represented
  • 100+ motions decided
  • 4 high-level dialogues
  • 8 days
  • 1000+ participants
  • 1300+ interactive sessions
  • 160+ countries represented
  • 100+ motions decided
  • 4 high-level dialogues


Advancing Women, Peace & Security in the Indo-Pacific

August 29 / 22:21 EDT by Celina Agaton
Advancing WPS in the Indo-Pacific

At the Pacific Forum’s Advancing Women, Peace & Security in the Indo-Pacific conference on September 1st, I’ll be speaking about how our Open Knowledge Regeneration Program creates local women-led employment, improves local knowledge stewardship and creates better data and climate change modeling, all using free and open-source tools.

Thursday, September 2, 2021 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM (HST) Session 7 |
Gender and Climate Security in the Indo-Pacific

This session explores different aspects of gender and climate security in the Indo-Pacific. What are examples of established and emerging evidence on the difference that women’s participation and leadership make on climate change responses? What are ongoing challenges posed by climate inaction to addressing gender equality, and vice versa? How and why are gender justice and climate justice interlinked? 

Speakers:

Joan Carling, Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development (IPMG); Indigenous Peoples Rights International (IPRI)

Dr. Laura Hosman, Arizona State University

Celina Agaton, Map the Philippines (MapPH) 

Maria Tanyag, Pacific Forum Women, Peace and Security Fellow

Moderator:

Sharon Bhagwan-Rolls, Shifting the Power Coalition / GPPAC Pacific

The Pacific Forum is a non-profit, foreign policy research institute based in Honolulu, Hawaii. The Forum’s programs encompass current and emerging political, security, economic and business issues and works to help stimulate cooperative policies in the Indo-Pacific region through analysis and dialogue undertaken with the region’s leaders in the academic, government, and corporate areas.

The Forum collaborates with a network of more than 30 research institutes around the Pacific Rim, drawing on Asian perspectives and disseminating its projects’ findings and recommendations to opinion leaders, governments, and publics throughout the region. We regularly cosponsor conferences with institutes throughout Asia to facilitate nongovernmental institution building as well as to foster cross-fertilization of ideas.

Pacific Forum was listed among the “2020 Best New Think Tanks” in the 2020 Global Go To Think Tank Index Report; having recently returned to it’s former fully-independent status. This is an annual ranking produced by the Lauder Institute at the University of Pennsylvania. The index looks at over 11,000 think tanks around the world.

In addition to ranking in the “2020 Best New Think Tanks” global category, Pacific Forum was listed in the top 100  “2020 Top Think Tanks in the United States.” Even more competitively, the organization was recognized as one of only 17 US think tanks listed in the top 73 “2020 Think Tanks With the Most Significant Impact on Public Policy” in the world.


Apply For a Telus Philippines Grant

May 17 / 07:47 EDT by Celina Agaton

For registered non-profits in the Philippines, we need more grant applicants! The next Telus grant application deadline is June 11. A single organization can receive as much as P500,000 within 1-2 months. Telus funds youth, LGBTQ, Indigenous, health, agriculture, culture, sports, education, environment and technology projects.

Apply online at https://bit.ly/3bw8j1Y

Learn about the program at https://www.telus.com/en/social-impact/giving-back/community-grants/philippines